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Practitioner

Susan Evans

Susan Evans has enjoyed working as a professional Acupuncturist since 1987 and is an active member of the British Acupuncture Council. She has a particular interest in the field of fertility and loves the amazing changes that come about using this powerful system of medicine. Susan has a passionate interest in helping others improve their health and well-being with acupuncture.

Qualifications

  • RGN
  • RSCN
  • LicAc
  • MBAcC

The point of acupuncture

Have you considered having acupuncture?

This powerful system of medicine called Traditional Acupuncture is now becoming a more frequent choice of therapy for people for a number of reasons. Because it aims to get to the root cause of your problem and not just address symptoms so this can often be an attractive solution.

A detailed consultation covering every aspect of your health and lifestyle will be taken at your first appointment and a treatment plan drawn up from that. Susan Evans, Acupuncturist at Millburn says “I may ask a lot of detailed questions and the reason is that in Chinese medicine we differentiate in many ways. E.g. A headache is not just a headache. I will want to know the type of pain, how long this has gone on, the location of the pain, any particular time of day, any related symptoms or any triggers or anything that helps. This helps me to build up a picture of where the imbalance lies within your system.”

How does acupuncture work?

Very fine needles (not much thicker than a hair) are inserted at precisely located points to connect with your body’s qi. The aim is to direct the flow of qi to trigger your body’s healing response and to restore physical, emotional and mental equilibrium. Treatment is designed to affect your whole being as well as your symptoms so, as the condition being treated improves, you may notice other health problems resolve and an increased feeling of wellbeing.

Any symptom is just a pointer that the qi is out of balance. A number of factors can disturb the qi flow, such as poor nutrition, hereditary factors, infections and trauma. When the qi is unbalanced, illness may result. Treatment is aimed at the root of your condition as well as your main symptoms.

Acupuncture is widely considered to be beneficial for a range of conditions. These are listed on the WHO website at www.who.int/en/. Check acupuncture recommendations.
More information is available on the British Acupuncture Council site at www.acupuncture.org.uk Go to research and you will find all the latest research on this wonderful system of medicine.

Back Pain

In 2009 the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommended that acupuncture should be made available on the NHS, as a cost-effective short-term treatment for the management of early, persistent non-specific lower back pain.

Female fertility

Infertility is the inability of a couple to get pregnant despite having regular unprotected sex. A couple is regarded as infertile if, after regular sexual intercourse, they have not conceived in two years. It is estimated that one in seven UK couples has difficulty conceiving (HFEA, 2006).

Identifiable causes of infertility include: ovulatory disorders in 27% of couples; tubal damage in 14% of couples; low sperm count or low sperm quality in 19% of couples. In 30% of couples the cause of infertility remains unexplained (NCCWCH, 2004). Female fertility declines with age, but the effect of age on male fertility is less clear (NICE, 2004). The difficulties couples encounter when facing fertility problems can lead to stress, which may further decrease chances of conception (Eugster & Vingerhoets, 1999). Acupuncture is a popular treatment choice for infertility (Smith 2010).

How acupuncture can help

Research has established plausible mechanisms to explain how acupuncture may benefit fertility:

  • Regulating fertility hormones - stress and other factors can disrupt the function of the hypothalamic pituitary-ovarian axis (HPOA), causing hormonal imbalances that can negatively impact fertility. Acupuncture has been shown to affect hormone levels by promoting the release of beta-endorphin in the brain, which affects the release of gonadotrophin releasing hormone by the hypothalamus, follicle stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland, and oestrogen and progesterone levels from the ovary (Ng 2008, Huang 2008, Lim 2010, Stener-Victorin 2010). Further details of these processes are emerging, for example mRNA expression of hormones, growth factors and other neuropeptides (He 2009)
  • Increasing blood flow to the reproductive organs - stress also stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, which causes constriction of ovarian arteries. Acupuncture inhibits this sympathetic activity, improving blood flow to the ovaries (Stener-Victorin 2006, Lim 2010), enhancing the environment in which ovarian follicles develop. It also increases blood flow to the uterus (Stener-Victorin 1996, Huang 2008), improving the thickness of the endometrial lining and increasing the chances of embryo implantation.
  • Counteracting the effects of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) - PCOS is one of the most common causes of female infertility. By reducing sympathetic nerve activity and balancing hormone levels, acupuncture has been shown to reduce the number of ovarian cysts, stimulate ovulation, enhance blastocyst implantation and regulate the menstrual cycle in women with PCOS (Stener-Victorin 2000, 2008, 2009, Zhang 2009). It may also help to control secondary effects such as obesity and anorexia (Lim 2010).

About your Practitioner

Susan Evans has enjoyed working as a professional Acupuncturist since 1987 and is an active member of the British Acupuncture Council. She has a particular interest in the field of fertility and loves the amazing changes that come about using this powerful system of medicine. Susan has a passionate interest in helping others improve their health and well-being with acupuncture.

Susan has been practicing Traditional Acupuncture for over 28 years after a career in nursing. She trained at the College of Traditional Acupuncture, Leamington Spa and the College of Integrated Chinese Medicine (CICM), Reading.

Both are accredited colleges with the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board.

Susan is a member of the British Acupuncture Council (MBAcC) and works as a Professional Development Lead for the British Acupuncture Council.

In 2008 Susan helped the Department of Health to set up a successful pilot scheme integrating alternative therapies into the NHS.

She is also a trained mentor / supervisor and works in this role with therapists of all disciplines.

Susan set up Millburn Complementary Therapy Centre in 2010 to give people in the area access to Complementary Therapies practised by fully qualified professionals under one roof.

“I love working with other practitioners and feel that a combination of treatments can often be the solution.“

Testimonials

“I started seeing Susan for some acupuncture while I was trying to conceive. I found the treatments gave me a great energy boost and she is a warm and lovely therapist. I continued the treatment throughout my pregnancy which helped with energy levels and sickness. She was also a great support during a particular hormonal meltdown!! She treated me at the end of my pregnancy and managed to get contractions started off. Would highly recommend.” Julie

“I had suffered from chronic backache for years and had to do something as I was having to have time off work. After a course of acupuncture I felt so much less pain and can now start exercising again to strengthen the lower back. The relief was great as I had been having some difficulty sleeping and now get a full nights rest.” Cathy